'TO'  IN ENGLISH VERBS:

 

A list of examples

 

 

It is a fundamental rule of English that the word 'to' can never follow a modal auxiliary. The word ‘to’ always follows 'ought' but if we remember these two words together and always use 'ought to' the rule is complete.

The first part of this list shows examples of this rule. The second part of the list - from "did he receive his tickets?" shows examples where the infinitive ('to receive') must not be used, although in European languages the infinitive might be correct.

The spaces ... indicate where the word ‘to’ does NOT go in English, although it might seem  correct.

 

I would…show you my passport if I had it.

She said she would…meet us here.

You would…prefer an aisle seat, wouldn’t you?

You could…ask that flight attendant

They could…help us to find the right desk.

We should…think of the children

I should…buy some flight insurance

The baggage reclaim should…be over there.

I think you must…sign the visa form.

We must…shelter from the rain.

You must…get fed up hearing complaints.

We shall…register at the hotel later.

I shall…find a baggage handler.

You will…receive some letters.

He will…provide a room for us.

We will…locate the ticket office.

I can…find a better hotel.

You can…keep all the foreign currency.

We can…rent a car over there.

I may…experience some delay.

You may…put my bags down there.

It may…cost more than you think.

It might…wake up the night staff.

You might…consider where the taxis are.

They might…notice us if we wait here.

Did he…receive his tickets?

Does he…know we are waiting?

Did she…bring the sandwiches?

Did we…choose correctly, I wonder?

Did they…expect us so early in the morning?

Do we…need a pass to enter this area?

Does my bag…weigh less than the official limit?

Do you…store my bags right here?

She does…understand our problem, doesn’t she?